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WW3: Radioactive Gas Detected In North Korea Following Hydrogen Bomb Test

Discovered traces of xenon-133 isotopes after Kim Jong-un's test

By: Jacky Murphy  |@NeonNettle
 on 13th September 2017 @ 12.10pm
radioactive as has been witnessed as following kim jong un s hydrogen bomb test © press
Radioactive as has been witnessed as following Kim Jong-un's hydrogen bomb test.

Radioactive as has been witnessed coming from North Korea following Kim Jong un's recent hydrogen bomb test.

South Korean observers had detected the deadly radioactive gas after they discovered traces of xenon-133 isotopes on nine separate occasions while equipment also found the substance four times of the nation's coast.

According to the executive commissioner, Choi Jongbae: "It was difficult to find out how powerful the nuclear test was with the amount of xenon detected, but we can say that it was from North Korea.”

Xenon-133 is a colorless gas that is used while operating nuclear fission reactors. The substance has been linked to North Korea following prior nuclear tests and did not occur organically. 

xenon 133 is a colorless gas that is used while operating nuclear fission reactors © press
Xenon-133 is a colorless gas that is used while operating nuclear fission reactors.

The DailyStar reports: Tubster Kim recently celebrated the country’s latest H-bomb test, which sent shockwaves through the international community.

Pictures released by the communist state’s mouthpiece showed crowds of thousands waving off the weapons developers in Pyongyang.

Buses drove through the capital while adoring crowds waved them off following the successful test on September 3.

Kim later failed to make good on fears he would launch another missile or detonate his seventh nuke on the founding day celebrations in the secretive nation.

Ghosts of the last time America went to war in Korea have been brought back to life through the work of a British electrician. The stunning pictures show ships lined up on the shore at the Battle of Inchon and troops boarding a plane ready for a drop behind enemy lines north of Pyongyang, Korea

The North’s top weapons scientists, however, headed back to their labs as the UN slapped new sanctions on the country in a bid to strangle the regime.

It is understood that they will continue to work with numerous substances, including xenon-133.

But South Korea’s nuclear boffins have said the traces detected would have no impact on South Korea’s environment and population.

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